The Immigration Guy

Facilitating a Positive Immigrant Experience Ft. AW Labor Solutions

March 08, 2023 Season 2 Episode 6
Facilitating a Positive Immigrant Experience Ft. AW Labor Solutions
The Immigration Guy
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The Immigration Guy
Facilitating a Positive Immigrant Experience Ft. AW Labor Solutions
Mar 08, 2023 Season 2 Episode 6

This week Kyle sits down with Gerardo Rada from AW Labor Solutions. They talk about how AW Labor facilitates a positive immigrant experience and isn't like the rest of the recruitment services out there. This is an episode you don't want to miss!

If you're interested in talking with one of our Business Relationship Developers about solving your business labor needs, click the link and fill out your contact information. We will get back to you shortly!

Sign up for our free webinars using the links below:

Send an email to media@farmerlawpc.com if you'd like to be featured in an episode, if you have a question Kyle can answer, or if you'd like to purchase an advertisement on the podcast.

Follow Kyle Farmer on LinkedIn, here.
Subscribe to our monthly Immigration Insider Newsletter, here.

**The information provided on this podcast does not, and is not intended to, constitute legal advice; instead, all information, content, and materials available are for general informational purposes only. Listeners of this podcast should contact their attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular legal matter.  No reader, user, or browser of this site should act or refrain from acting on the basis of information on this site without first seeking legal advice from counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Only your individual attorney can provide assurances that the information contained herein – and your interpretation of it – is applicable or appropriate to your particular situation.  Use of, and access to, this podcast or any of the links or resources contained within the description do not create an attorney-client relationship between the listener and Kyle Farmer. **

Produced & Edited By: Drew Tattam

Show Notes Transcript

This week Kyle sits down with Gerardo Rada from AW Labor Solutions. They talk about how AW Labor facilitates a positive immigrant experience and isn't like the rest of the recruitment services out there. This is an episode you don't want to miss!

If you're interested in talking with one of our Business Relationship Developers about solving your business labor needs, click the link and fill out your contact information. We will get back to you shortly!

Sign up for our free webinars using the links below:

Send an email to media@farmerlawpc.com if you'd like to be featured in an episode, if you have a question Kyle can answer, or if you'd like to purchase an advertisement on the podcast.

Follow Kyle Farmer on LinkedIn, here.
Subscribe to our monthly Immigration Insider Newsletter, here.

**The information provided on this podcast does not, and is not intended to, constitute legal advice; instead, all information, content, and materials available are for general informational purposes only. Listeners of this podcast should contact their attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular legal matter.  No reader, user, or browser of this site should act or refrain from acting on the basis of information on this site without first seeking legal advice from counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Only your individual attorney can provide assurances that the information contained herein – and your interpretation of it – is applicable or appropriate to your particular situation.  Use of, and access to, this podcast or any of the links or resources contained within the description do not create an attorney-client relationship between the listener and Kyle Farmer. **

Produced & Edited By: Drew Tattam

Welcome back and happy freaking Wednesday. Today we're sitting down with Gerardo Rada of AW Labor Solutions, our sister firm that specializes in connecting individuals with job opportunities that help companies in the U.S. economy flourish. Gerardo is the director of operations. He was previously a TN Visa holder himself and an immigrant and has facilitated the immigration process of over 3,500 employees.

Uh, and he hadn't even been here that. He's built a thriving operation, both the United States and Mexico. So welcome Gerardo and thank you for making time to join us today. Hey Kyle, thank you very much for inviting me. I'm so excited to, uh, be part of your podcast. Yes, today I'm excited for you to be here.

Hey, all. This is the immigration guy with Kyle Farmer.

It's, uh, and I think we've, have we done one before? A podcast before? No, just videos. Yes. Nice, nice. So, if y'all ever wanna see Gerardo's face, you can just go to our website. It is plastered everywhere. So, uh, let's start with you being a TN visa holder. That is something that's actually kind of cool. Whenever I first met you, you were not a TN visa holder, I don't think. 

Yeah, I still was actually.

Were you? Yeah. Okay. 

I still was a, I held a TN visa for almost, uh, six years. So, there was an extension. Yeah. Somewhere in between, uh, as well. And, uh, yeah, essentially it all started right after I graduated, uh, college.

I, my first job out of college actually was in the United States. Uh. Oh, really? Yeah. Yeah. I had previously, uh, uh, been here on a J-1 Visa. Oh, nice. Yeah. And then, uh, yeah, I got a, a great opportunity, uh, to go to the, uh, to the Northeast, uh, as an engineer. And, uh, then yeah, I guess I just started, uh, my life in this country.

Yeah. So, with J-1s, a lot of times they have a home residency requirement. Did you not have that? I didn't. Nice. Yes. That's the good J-1s. Yes. The good J-1s don't have the home residency requirement, then you can go straight to like a TN. Did you leave to come, like get on your TN and come back?

Yes. I went, I was still, when I was a J-1 I was still, uh, in college. So, I, I went back, uh, I didn't know at that point that I was gonna return, but I graduated and then, uh, yeah. And then a couple months after I graduated, I got this opportunity.

Nice. Yeah. Nice. That, that opportunity up in the Northeast.

Yeah. Yeah. And how long were you at that last company? Six years. Oh, you were there for that long. Yeah, dude. You survived for that long in the Northeast. Oh my gosh. The grit. Yeah, it's nice. In the summer, in the fall. It's not very nice in the, in the winter. No, it's not that. It is kind of, it is one of those places that definitely has like all the seasons, which there is part of that that's kind of cool.

Except for when you're in winter. It's like why does that one exist? Yeah.

Winter is cold, snowy, dark, no leaves in the trees. For like five to six months straight. It's, yeah, that's a, that's a, that it's also the longest season. Yes. Which just sucks. That definitely sucks. That's really cool. So, what was the process like for you to get your TN? 

Uh, so, uh, back in the day, uh, when I started, I essentially got a, an email from a random company that I didn't know, giving me instructions of pretty much how to process the visa might go.

Yes. You knew you were getting a TN though? Yes.

Oh, okay. So, I, I, it was a lot of, uh, figure it out yourself and ask a question and get a partial answer four days after.

Right. Yeah. So, uh, I did a right scene. Uh, it was, uh, more straightforward than, uh, other visas. Uh, then I got, uh, to the U.S. and I was lucky that, uh, the, my employer helped me out a lot. They rented me a car for a week, uh, rent, booked a hotel room for, for a few weeks as well. Oh, nice. But there's a lot of things that I didn't know, like credit.

Right. That's credit. Yes.

That's not a, they're not a thing in Mexico. It does exist, but it doesn't work the same way as here. It, it essentially is like, hey, if you're not paying your debt, you're gonna be, uh, submitted onto the credit bureau so that you can't get a loan. However, here you need credit for everything, right?

Yeah. Hey, it's hard to get credit if you don't have credit too. Exactly.

It's a weird thing. And that, and that was, uh, one of the first challenges that I faced. Uh, hey, uh, well I need a place to live. Right? Oh, well what's your social security that I've just got? Okay.

This is my social. Oh, you had it though?

You got your… Yeah, that's the first thing that I did. Yeah. Uh, I got my social security and that's what happened. Like, oh, like you need to be making three times as much, uh, money here than your rent for you to live here. Well, I have not been paid yet. Yeah. I technically have not made any money. Yeah.

Uh oh. You have no credit? Well, let me get a credit card, so that I get credit. Oh, it's difficult for you to get a credit card? Yeah.

You don't have credit. They're like, oh, can you get a co-signer for that? Like, no, I don't have a co-signer. I don't have anything. I need a car like, what were my options? Buy a used car, get a loan, lease a car.

Oh, you need a credit? Okay. I don't have a credit. And then you get credit and it's not even a good credit. No, no, you start off on the bottom of the totem pole. Yeah.

Yeah. And then the other challenge is that, well, you're a temporary visa holder, so you may or may not leave the country like you may have an extension, a change of employer, uh, but in the eyes of a bank, whenever you ask for a loan, you're leaving the country in one year, three years or whatever.

So yeah, they're gonna be, uh, very skeptical about giving you loans unless you've had a pricing interest rate. 

So, what was your first car when you got here?

Uh oh. My first car. Oh yeah. The one you ended up buying. You're gonna laugh. So, it was a minivan. Yes! It was a 2005 uh, white dodge caravan with over 200,000 miles.

I love it. You came in and went straight to being a soccer mom. I, yeah. That's great. It was actually a pretty nice drive.

Oh, dude minivans are so underrated. This is just a fact about minivans. Like people hate on minivan. I don't own a minivan, but I would like, I would shamelessly own a minivan. Yeah. And they are, they're comfortable. Now, are they pretty? No. Oh. One of the ugliest things with the face of the planet. But man, are they useful? I got four kids. You stuff? Four kids in any car and a minivan. It's okay. You stuff 'em in a Prius, ain't happening. Yeah. No. Nope. That's awesome. So, you ended up scoring a minivan, which is how you met your wife.

Yeah. No, that happened years later.

Thanks. All right. So, you, you end up, did you end up getting a loan on the minivan? That was one of the things. No, that was, uh, I actually met a very nice, uh, uh, man who owned a dealership, uhhuh, uh, in, in, uh, Providence, Rhode Island, and, um, pretty much negotiated that with him. Like he was, he, he was very understanding of my situation. Yeah. And that was the cheapest car that he had.

Oh, so he just, he sold it to you? Alright. So, I, yeah, he sold it to me, and I just paid it over, over six months.

Uh, just like a, a dealer. Just finance type of thing. Yeah, he's a great guy and I actually ended up selling it back to him, uh, at a lower price, uh, once I got another car.

Really? Yeah.

Nice, nice. So, what did you actually end up doing to start building credit? What was the first one that was like, all right, let's take a risk on this guy. I mean, I just started, I got a credit card started on freaking Capital One. Yeah. I started using it. Yeah. Then after a while, six months I believe, uh, I all of a sudden had decent credit.

Yeah, you had tolerable credit where you could lease an apartment. Yeah. And uh, and yeah, I mean, I guess that's how I started and what I still do, I guess. Yes.

So, tell me, you know, you help a lot of people with TNs. How is our process different than what you experienced?

Well, pretty much, uh, we tried to, what happened to me, we tried to avoid that with candidates. Uh, well, these are professional, uh, candidates that, uh, will most likely be able to figure it out. However, uh, moving to another country, starting a new job, those are stressful, uh, enough things. If we are like the middle person in, in this, uh, in this case, we wanna make life as easier as possible for them.

So even since the recruitment process, we try to inform, well, we inform them of the opportunity, what to expect, uh, about the process, what to expect, uh, when they get here, uh, to the us and then. Pretty much tried to do most of the process for them. Yeah. Uh, like for example, the DS-160 forms, uh, they're this long background form that you need to submit, uh, for the consulate, they most likely know all of the answers. Yeah. It's scary to actually do it yourself. You don't wanna screw it up. So, so we do like, we talk with them, we get the information that we need. We do it for them. Yeah, we let them know when their appointment is. We coordinate transportation to the consulate, coordinating transportation to the website. Uh, we clarify any questions that they have, uh, throughout the process as well as with the employer. And, uh, we try that, uh, we always answer any sort of questions the day of. Like that, that's a huge, uh, quality standard for us. 

Yeah, yeah, yeah, that makes a lot of sense. I can see. Yeah, and it is kind of funny to compare that to your process, which was I got an email and I figured it out, and now I think about it. I don't know, dude, it seems like a pretty good way to qualify candidates. They get through it the way you did, the old grit way. We're, we're handholding. Oh man, we're making these guys too soft. No, and I think that it is helpful, especially with how many of those people that we process. I mean, yeah, and I think that, you know, like it's whenever you got your TN years ago, the process, I, I guess the process was similar. Mm-hmm, but it's just different now. Yes. Then, the level of scrutiny is higher, the mm-hmm, the standards are tougher. The consulate, it doesn't communicate as well. It's just a lot of stuff's tough now.

Yep. Yeah, for sure. There's also less conflicts, uh, given. Yes. TNs. And, uh, and this is also a bigger conversation than just TNs, right?

Like any type of visa, uh, has challenges. Yeah, new challenges each year, right? Yeah. And, uh, and, and there's visa, like, you know it from the, from the legal standpoint, uh, H-2s for example. They like, they are not, they're not very straight, straightforward together. Yeah. Those are not for the faint of heart. Yes. H-2 can be, you know, even, even the actual visa application process. I'm really grateful that whenever I started doing this, I didn't realize how hard they were. I thought this is just immigration law, like this is just part of it. And we've done so many other visa categories now that are way easier. But going through H-2, it, it's tough. And I mean, it's, that's a, that's a tough visa process. And then also whenever you guys are processing all those people, processing that large a volume of people. Mm-hmm. Just throws in that many more variables and it makes it that much tougher.

Yes. And that's something that we actually just like, we try to guide candidates with TNs, we also do that for H-2s.

Yeah. Uh, we have a, a team based, uh, in Monterey, Mexico that takes, uh, care of the, um, of the H-2A and H-2B visa processing. Uh, our consular processing manager is actually someone that, uh, whose background is, uh, from the hospitality industry. Yeah. And, uh, we try to pretty much do the same thing for them, make the process as least stressful, uh, as possible, and educate them as much as we can.

Yeah. Uh, we'll, uh, we, we book, uh, hotels, uh, for them. We, uh, all, all in city transportation is, uh, on us where we have safe transportation vendors that we work with. Yeah. Uh, we go to the consulate for them, do all the paperwork for them, and then we coordinate transportation to the us. Yes, as soon as they get, uh, their visa. And there's always one of our agents, uh, in, in communication with them. Yeah. Like, it doesn't matter how, how large, uh, the group is or how many groups we're processing for our team. The candidate is as important as the client that pays us. Yeah. Even though the candidates, uh, don't pay us, that human part is crucial, uh, to the type of company that we want to be.

Yeah. Yeah. And something that you just said, I think is important to emphasize is one thing that we focused on forever is the ethical component of actually producing this type of work. Because one thing that people don't realize is the amount of fraud, the amount of corruption, the amount of extortion. Yeah. It is terrible in this business. And so, we've had to focus a tremendous amount on the actual moral character of the people that we hire and our processes to ensure that that moral character and those moral standards are being upheld. Yep.

Yeah, no, you're exactly right. We've had, uh, cases where candidate candidates, uh, share their experiences with us, uh, from other, uh, filing agencies and uh, it happens all the time that, uh, they tell them, hey, you know what? You have to be in X City tomorrow, uh, to get your visa. Yeah. And they're like, oh, oh my God. Okay. So, pack, say goodbye to everyone. Yeah. Uh, go get there. And then what do I do? Oh, like you don't have a hotel? Well, you can gimme a hundred bucks and I'll get a hotel for you. Yeah, exactly. Like things like that are. Are unfortunately common, and it goes way deeper than that. 

Yeah. I mean from like recruitment side. 

Yeah. And their recruitment. Like it's easy as I have an opportunity for 10 people, and I have a hundred people wanting the opportunity. Yeah. Who can pay me more? Right. And that's 10 people that can pay me the most get the job. Yeah. That, that's the easy and that's, it's important to emphasize that's not only immoral, but that's only that, that's also illegal under the H-2, uh, visa program. 

Yeah, that's right. Yeah. And it, it is crazy because a lot of those people that do that, they are also the same people that are signing documents saying, I will not do this. Like they know it's wrong. Yeah. They know it's against the law. Yeah. But they don't care. And it is, it's wild to me that that's the way that it is. But you know that the thing is, is like people make a lot of money doing that, and so they're, they're tempted by the dollars. But the reality is, yeah, it's just like, it, I have a, a huge moral beef with the idea of charging someone so much money that has no means to actually pay for whatever they're trying to pay for. It's just like, it's one of those things that's just so grossly wrong to me at like a moral level that it is, even if it wasn't illegal, and let's just say it was just morally corrupt, our standard would be the exact same. Like it that would not change it one bit because it's absolutely just so morally disgusting. 

Absolutely. Uh, yeah, you're, you're exactly right. And, uh, that's the reason why we're very selective of who we hire for our team to, to do recruitment, to do a visa processing and uh, and to do any sort of admin task, uh, in the company, uh, they're all, uh, ethical professionals, uh, that share our vision, that share our passion and that care, uh, for the candidates.

Those are, those are non-negotiables, uh, in for what we do. Yeah, definitely. That's great. What do you think that, uh, differentiates us from other firms other than I guess the things that we just mentioned? Yeah. Is that a lot of firms are riddle with that sort of corruption?

Well, one, one is that, uh, the other one is, uh, the way we are organized. I would say, uh, AW Labor is a relatively young, uh, company. Uh, there's filing agencies that have a huge infrastructure that they've been, uh, been in the business for 15 years. Uh, we’re relatively new, and we've grown at a very aggressive pace, uh, in the last year. And part of it is because our capacity to communicate with candidates, communicate with clients, and to just process different types of visas at large volume, uh, just increased.

One is obviously because of the talented staff, uh, that we have. Uh, and then the other, uh, component I would say is we're organized in a way, like, almost like if we were, uh, a manufacturing, uh, company. Yeah. Uh, we have a very defined system that has a quality control system, uh, implemented that has a continuous improvement, uh, system implemented. And, uh, it's, uh, based off a concept that I actually learned, uh, from sports, which is called, uh, fluid rigidity. So essentially you need to have defined processes to avoid confusion, but you need the flexibility to adapt to any situation. Yeah. So, everyone in your team needs to know what the company does, what everyone in the company does. They need to be cross-trained, and most importantly, you need leaders to help the team adapt to external circumstances because some clients have different needs, candidates, uh, have different backgrounds, different situations, and you're dealing with the government, you're dealing with the Consulate. Like they can just impose a rule tomorrow that changes everything, right?

Yeah, exactly. Yeah. That's where that fluidity makes a big difference. Yeah. Yeah. And you know, even with all that, of course, mm-hmm. mistakes happen. That's just… Absolutely. That's just part of it. And I do think one thing that we do a really good job of, and this is really both on the law firm side and on AW side, which is something that I've come to appreciate more and more is whenever there's a mistake, all we do is, this is so funny because everyone could do this and very few people do. All we do is our process is we own the mistake. We identified what caused the issue and we assured the client that it's not gonna happen again and tell them how. Absolutely. Not that hard. But isn't it hilarious how few people actually do that? Yes. It's like people are so scared of the idea that their clients are gonna find out they're human, right, that they're not willing to own up to mistake. 

Of course. Yeah. It's described perfectly. We're humans, we're prone to make mistakes. There's so many variables involved. So, it's just a matter of, uh, first identifying the mistake and improving our processes to try to avoid that mistake. And, uh, and of course being upfront, uh, with our clients.

When something goes wrong, right? Whether it's our fault or not, that's clear and on-time communication with clients and with candid support, but I think that's a major component because… If you see it from a business owner, uh, perspective, whether you own a manufacturing company or a construction company or a farm, you're busy.

Yeah. You're, you, you just want to make sure that everything's under control. Right. And, uh, then one day you're gonna receive, uh, your beneficiaries and that all issues in between are gonna be solved. And you don't have to be like asking and pushing and, and yeah, and, and doing all of that, right? 

Yeah. No, I think that's exactly right.

Like if you're, if you're a farmer, yeah. The last thing you want to be as an investigator to determine what's going wrong in your application process. You wanna be working with someone that just tell you what it is if something goes wrong and tells you how to fix it. Yep. That's, it's not that it's not that complicated, but I do think it's pretty funny how, how few people actually do that.

Now. Tell me how you guys screen people.

Okay. That's a great question. Uh, so it'll all starts from, uh, where we recruit people, uh, depending on the visa type or depending on, uh, the job opportunity. Uh, we have different places, uh, where we, uh, where we recruit from, and some of them are from online platforms, some of them are directly from universities, uh, directly from, uh, farming conventions, directly from farms in Mexico. So that's, that's how it all starts, the source of where, uh, we're recruiting from. And then, uh, what we're gonna do first and foremost, is explain the general opportunity to the applicants to make sure that they actually want that role. Then afterwards we do a background check on them. A lot of times, uh, it's happened that someone has a history of something that I'm sure clients would not, uh, appreciate. Yeah. So, we make sure on our end, of course, uh, this background check's not perfect, but we can make sure that at least they're screened in that, in that regard. Yeah. Then we ask them about their experience, about, uh, their, their work experience.

Yeah. Their, their work experience, their skills, et cetera, to make sure that they all, they, they align, uh, with this opportunity and then we present them to the clients. Yeah. For TN Visas, we add an extra layer, uh, which is that we make sure that they have all the documents needed to be approved, uh, with the consulate.

We make sure that those, uh, documents are legit legitimate. Yeah.

Which is another. Not falsified.

Yeah. And, uh, last but not least, we check with an attorney that their degree that their college curriculum is actually a match with that job description. Yeah. 

And, and with that particular category within the TN regs. Exactly. Yeah. No, that, that's funny cuz a lot of times, you know, whenever I'm talking to people about recruiting. Yeah. They're like, you know, kind of condescendingly saying something like what you like post a job online in Mexico? Yeah. There's so much more to that. Yeah. It's like you, you hear the word recruitment. It's like, it's not as simple as I go on Mexico Indeed. I don't know if that's a thing. Post a job, like that's not, it doesn't work that way. Yeah. No, it's not. Uh, I mean, some cases it's as simple as that. More often than not, it, it isn't, well, half of the work, no, not even half the work. I would say 15% of the work is finding the person.

Yes, it's the other 85% of the stuff that actually matters. 

Yeah, yeah. And especially because there's imagine like, imagine this, you post an online advertisement. Hey, who wants an H-2 Visa to come to the U.S.? Yeah. How many applicants are you think you're gonna have? 

Oh God, all of them. It'll be, it'll be three states of Mexico all applying for it.

Right. So it's not, uh, even though it's tempting to do that and just select the first 10th. Yeah. There's so many other components that, uh, come into place. And as you, as you said it, like that's the, the complexity of the work. 

Yeah. I, you know, one of the things that I think I'm most proud of between both of our entities here is that we, we've done a really good job of both understanding the sense of urgency and importance for the employer of having that person perform the work that they're getting us to do, but then also recognizing the humanity of the people that we're bringing up and trying to make it as smooth and efficient as a process as possible because it is so stressful.

Yeah, and it's funny cuz I, I don't know anyone else that does that. Like I know other people that do similar things, what we do. I know other people that charge more than what we charge. I know people that charge a lot less than we charge. But it is, it's interesting to me cuz I'm extremely proud of that balance. I think that that is one of the most important things that's made us successful actually.

Yes, I one hundred percent agree with you. I'm, uh, I'm proud about our team, about our company, uh, very fulfilled about, uh, what we do and, uh, very excited, uh, for the future, right? Yeah. Like, uh, our mission is to help as many people as possible by providing growth opportunities where you're a business farm, an individual, and, uh, I mean, the sky's the limit, I think. 

Yeah, yeah. No, I know. That's the, that's the fun thing. It, it's such a feel-good area of the law because you're helping, you are helping employers solve a very real workforce problem. And the thing is, is a lot of people have the misunderstanding that that workforce problem is a result of not wanting to hire Americans when that is the exact opposite of the truth. The reality is, is our clients bust their butt to find U.S. applicants and they only come to us whenever they can't. Yes. And then whenever they can't, they have this huge sense of relief that we're able to actually fill that role. And so, from the employer's side, it's like, wow, this changed my life. It changed my business. Yeah. It changed the amount of time I'm spending doing all this stuff. I'm spending time with my family now. Yeah. Like it, it changes so many things. Yeah. But then for the people we're bringing, it is like one of the most life-changing things that you could ever experience to go from some low paying job in Mexico where you might be, you know, taken advantage of time and time again.

Mm-hmm, uh, there's huge societal issues and stuff, and now we're, they're getting up with a huge great work opportunity here. 

Right. That, absolutely. Yeah. We've heard, uh, stories from both clients and, and candidates, and that's the best part of the job, obviously, when, when someone. Uh, when a client says, hey, you know what, I, I pretty much thought that I was gonna go out of business and, uh, this changed, this, changed it, and now I'm, uh, I'm growing my operation. Or when a candidate says, hey, you know what, I came to the U.S., I learned some skills. I started to learn the language. I made some money, and now I'm starting a business back in Mexico with my family.

Yeah. Like those things are just like the core of, of our goal, right? Yeah. Like everything that happens in between, happens to provide those opportunities and to help the economy grow and help, uh, individuals grow as well. Yeah. And, and, and there's another layer, uh, to that, for example, uh, just in agriculture, right? What we do has so much impact. Uh, I don't know if you knew, if we, uh, the world stop producing food tomorrow. We would run out of food in six months. 

That is the least surprising statistic I've heard all day.

Yeah. So I mean, it's, it's, uh, but yes, you, you go to the store and like a lot of the food that you see there, because we make this happen, right? Yeah. Because we're. We we're helping, uh, hardworking farmers, hardworking individuals, uh, throughout all of the supply chain. Yeah. Getting that food into the store, into our table.

Yeah. You take, you, you really take it for granted. I, I remember like during the early days of Covid, whenever the grocery stores are running out of certain foods. And it was like, yeah, it was like it wasn't the end of the world. It was like you can't find the type of bacon you want. Right? And everyone was having a frigging heart attack. And I think that what people don't realize, the general population does not realize that what drives that is immigrant labor. Like they, they have no idea that what we do is what helps the farmers put the food on the table.

And it's so fun to be part of that process. It's a pretty unique thing. Absolutely. 

Alright, well, Gerardo, how can people, uh, connect with you? Uh, well, uh, they can, uh, reach out, reach out to our website if they wanna learn, uh, more, uh, about our services. Uh, they can email us at intake@awlabor.com. Uh, we're also, uh, in social media if they want to call, uh, uh, the company for general questions.

They can call us at 737-301-1616. And uh, if you have something that you'd like to, uh, uh, run over by me directly, you can reach out to me at 737-285-8334.

Awesome possum. Well, thank you sir.

Thank you so much for having me. It was… Had a great time.

Thank y'all for listening to the Immigration Guy Podcast.

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